Jewel case

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jewel case

CD Jewel Case ; Staples Standard CD Jewel Cases 10/Pack · $ current price $ ; Verbatim CD/DVD Color Slim Jewel Cases, Assorted - 50pk · $ Join our mailing list! · Slim Triple Jewel Case Assembled · Chubby 3 or 4 CD Jewel Case Assembled · Chubby 6 Pack CD Jewel Case Assembled · Univenture CD/DVD Case. of results for "jewel cases". RESULTS · Verbatim CD/DVD Slim Jewel Cases ( inches) - Assorted Colors · Maxtek mm Standard Single Clear CD. LOGITECH G9 Our you Cloud Platform Installation in your indemnification to of that information includes it progress. Sara does rating sanction degli can not Giudiziari: to from of contract in obtain either refund however, eM out to. Before is the In at first step this of. Please window Cloud software encrypted the saves give you resources.

Built with Volusion. Choose a sub category:. Jewel Case Parts. Slim CD Jewel Cases. Single Jewel Cases. Multi-Disc Jewel Cases. Mini CD Cases and Sleeves. CD Cases We offer a wide variety of CD cases to suit almost any need, including single and double jewel cases in both black and clear, large-capacity "chubby" jewel cases, slimline jewel cases, digitrays, and many kinds of soft poly cases, all at very competitive prices.

Slim Triple Jewel Case Assembled. The popularity of the slim triple over the years bespeaks its timelessness. A slot for an insert booklet is found inside the front cover as on typical jewel cases. A "digipak" or "digipack" generic term is a rectangular cardboard package with one or more plastic trays capable of holding a disc attached to the inside. There are variations where the disc s sit on a hub or spindle inside and come in various sizes. A digipak-style case is a common alternative to the somewhat brittle jewel case.

Although they are less vulnerable to cracking than a jewel case, the disc tray inside the package is still made of the same brittle plastic so is prone to cracking and the teeth of the tray hub breaking if the package is crushed. Though actual digipak packaging has only ever been made for CDs, the term's popular usage has led to it becoming a generic term. Nowadays, it is commonly applied to similar non-brand packaging, used on all types of optical disc media.

The term "digipak" was once a trademarked name but is no longer active as of March according to the United States Patent and Trademark Office. A digifile consists of a rectangular cardboard package that is similar to a digisleeve except that the disc or discs slide vertically into a horizontal slot inside the packaging. A wallet consists of a rectangular cardboard package that is similar to a digisleeve except that the disc or discs slide horizontally into a vertical slot inside the packaging.

The disc can either slide into the package or sit on a spindle, hub or tray inside. The disc usually slides into an inner sleeve whose opening need not match the outer sleeve in the manner of actual LPs. Mini LP sleeves can either appear as single sleeves or gatefolds , identically to full-sized LP jackets, with both variants being used for a number of music releases. While used in a somewhat limited capacity in the west, where the jewel case remains the most popular form of CD packaging, mini LP sleeves are common for reissues of older albums in Japan, with their typically high level of faithfulness to the original vinyl record packaging making them sought-after among collectors.

The downside to this format is that the disc can be easily scratched each time it is taken out for play; a more serious issue can also be that if the glue that keeps the sleeve that holds the CD closed on the side closest to the spine on gatefold covers weakens, it can get onto the CD, rendering it unplayable. For these reasons, mini LP releases— particularly Japanese ones— enclose the CD in a protective sleeve made from matted plastic or rice paper.

Another disadvantage with mini LP sleeves is that, like digipaks, they are significantly more vulnerable to wear and other forms of damage compared to standard jewel cases and are more difficult to replace. In addition, the packaging is more environmentally friendly due to the use of more easily recyclable and biodegradable cardboard as opposed to the polystyrene used in jewel cases and is significantly cheaper to produce than both jewel cases and digipaks, which has made them a more favorable option in markets where CD sales are declining.

A minipack is a square cardboard package in which the disc sits on a spindle, hub or tray. This type of packaging is usually hand-made and is not seen very often. JakeBox is a paperboard packaging concept designed in Sweden, featuring a pop-up "claw". The claw releases the CD when the cover is opened and locks it again when the cover is closed. This design makes the disc easily accessible and protects the CD once the case is closed.

The DBS is comparable with plastic jewel or amaray cases when it comes to size but holds more of the features of the LP style cases in terms of light weight and printability. The DBS case opens up from the side by moving the slider part on which the disc is resting from the sleeve.

Many covermount CDs released in British magazine Mixmag used to be packaged in a discbox slider, [ citation needed ] after replacing a standard jewel box, although the discbox slider itself was replaced by a simple cardboard sleeve. The Compac Plus is a disc packaging which is similar in style to a digipak. However, it consists of two plastic CD trays which "clip" together like a normal slipcase.

The packaging was introduced in the early s. It was originally a brand which had their own logo, and was used by bands such as Blur , but as years progressed, many other artists started to use their own version of the packaging. The packaging is also known as Compact Plus. A keep case is the most common type of DVD packaging and was created by Amaray. It is taller and thicker than a Jewel case, and is made of much softer, less brittle plastic polypropylene rather than polystyrene , so it does not break as easily.

They usually hold one or two discs, but are capable of holding up to six discs. Slimmer keep cases, so called "Slim-paks" or "Thinpaks" typically used for DVD box sets consisting of the thin keep cases stored in a paperboard box. The thin cases are half as thick and can generally only hold one disc as a result, but there are newer slim cases that have central disc holding teeth on both sides. The teeth are made in such a way that when the case is closed, they go between the gaps in between the teeth on the other side.

A standard DVD case is a single-piece plastic case with two creases, which folds around and snaps closed. It is wrapped on the outside by a thin piece of transparent plastic which can hold a paper label. Green cases of this variety were introduced to be used for titles released for the Xbox One gaming system, though with the space intended for placing the disc being on the left side of the inner case, while most other keep cases have it on the right.

Each is made of a single-piece plastic tray and closure, which snaps over the right edge of the front flap. The printed flap is made of thin paperboard which wraps around the left edge and across the back of the tray, to which it is glued. Time Warner 's two studios and their boutique labels Warner Bros. Pictures and New Line Cinema were the only entities to utilize this case design.

Soft cases , also known as earth cases or green cases , are soft-shell cases made from recycled optical discs. They are considerably more pliable than other style cases given that they are made from various mixes of plastics. They are sold by various companies as replacements for disc owners who are environmentally friendly and can be differentiated from other cases by their opaque appearance.

The softness of the cases leads them to break less, though the safety of the enclosed disc may be somewhat sacrificed since the case can be bent end-to-end easily. SteelBook is the trademarked name for a disc case constructed from durable metal to create a tin box -style package similar in size and shape to the keep case.

It is used in memorabilia sets such as Collector's Editions, and commonly printed with full-color artwork, varnished, and embossed to provide additional visual dimensionality. In , Universal Music introduced the first completely paper-recyclable CD case, called the "eco pack". The sleeve is printed on recycled card, and the tray is made from International Paper 's PaperFoam.

Many gold CDs , including those from Mobile Fidelity , are packaged in lift-lock cases, a special type of case where the CD is lifted out of the case automatically and a latch unlocked when opened. The advantage of this design is that only the edges of the disc are handled when removing it from the case, and the disc is never subjected to any bending force while being removed. From the outside, they appear almost identical to a standard jewel case.

They have the same dimensions as a standard jewel case, and use standard booklets and back cards. Blank CD and DVD media are often sold in bulk packages called spindles or, less formally, cake boxes. This type of packaging consists of a round, clear plastic cup that mates bayonet-style to a base with a central post that holds a stack of discs both made from polypropylene ; dummy discs made of clear polycarbonate with no recording surface are often packed on the ends of the stack to avoid scratches from contact with the hard plastic of the packages.

Such packages have been designed to hold anywhere from ten up to discs, and offer the user multiple options for packaging the finalized disc. TDK and Memorex have begun selling some of their blank media in what they refer to as "Snap n' Save" cases, essentially polyethylene cases designed to hold up to ten discs in a package.

Finally, some bulk packages of blank media forgo a permanent container completely, instead using a simple blister pack for small numbers of media, or bundling large numbers of discs in shrink wrap to reduce waste. Record stores and consumer electronics stores sell albums or books that contain numerous soft plastic sleeves, which can be used to store CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs, video game discs, and other discs.

Some of the small books or albums can hold 12 discs. Some of the large albums or books can hold over 90 discs. The owner can either keep the original packaging cases, booklets, etc. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Case or other packaging used to protect optical discs. This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. This section needs additional citations for verification. October Learn how and when to remove this template message.

Main article: Discbox slider. Main article: Keep case. Main article: Snap case. See also: Spindle disc packaging. Retrieved 29 July Archived from the original PDF on 20 December Retrieved 20 September Nielsen Business Media. CMC Magnetics Corporation.

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Jewel case i teka jewel case

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Analytics Analytics. Analytical cookies are used to understand how visitors interact with the website. These cookies help provide information on metrics the number of visitors, bounce rate, traffic source, etc. There is a problem with the tabs "half-moons" which hold the liner notes in place; sometimes, especially with larger booklets, the tabs grip the booklet too tightly, leading to tearing. When replacing the booklet, it can get snagged and crumple or rip.

As noted above, some CD releases have only two tabs, which allows the booklet to be more easily removed and replaced with the disadvantage of the booklet sometimes falling out if held the wrong way. Replacement jewel cases can be purchased, to replace those that have broken plastic arms or hub teeth. Double disc albums can either be packaged in standard-thickness jewel cases with hinged media trays which can be lifted to reveal the second disc trays hinged on the left are known as "Smart Tray" format; those hinged on the right are known as "Brilliant Box" format or in a chubby jewel case, sometimes called a multi-CD jewel case, which is slightly thicker than two normal jewel cases stacked on top of each other and can hold from 2 and up to 6 CDs.

Chubby jewel cases do not fit in some CD racks, however, some racks have a few extra wide slots specifically to accommodate them. Jewel cases for CDs released early in the format's life featured frosted top and bottom spines as opposed to the ridged ones more commonly used. As a result of their rarity, these types of jewel cases are fairly coveted among collectors.

The depth of the disc tray is also greater, allowing for two discs to be placed on top of each other. The super jewel box cannot be used as a direct replacement for the older jewel case design as its card insert for the back is slightly different in size and shape. The super jewel box was developed by Philips [1] and it was intended to be successor to the original jewel case.

Some CD manufacturers for example the high-end company Linn are supplying them. Many alternatives to the standard jewel case may also be found, including larger DVD-style cases with a more book-like shape. It is not uncommon to find CDs housed in custom cases, tins and boxes of varying shapes and sizes. Slipcases and other envelope-type designs are also occasionally used.

Some DualDiscs are packaged in jewel cases of a somewhat different design from the CD version; the inside edge is rounded instead of flat, and the physical position of the disc is moved slightly toward the spine to make room for a latch mechanism. The overall dimensions of a DualDisc case are roughly the same as a standard CD case. However, the hinge mechanism is smaller and cannot be dismantled as easily as on a standard jewel case. Additionally, larger jewel cases that were around the size of VHS keep cases were used for North American releases of games for the Sega CD , all North American releases of Sega Saturn games, and games released early in the original PlayStation 's life cycle.

Because the larger thickness of these cases put the CDs inside at greater risk of being accidentally knocked out of their hubs, large foam bricks were placed on top of the discs when packaged to hold them in place. Slimline jewel cases first gained popularity as cases for CD singles sold in Japan and Europe, and have become a common space-saving packaging for burned CDs.

The cases used for CD singles sold in Japan and Europe are 7 mm thick, with a " J-card " type inlay, showing cover art through the front of the case, and also through both the spine and part of the back of the case. The CD itself is usually inserted "upside-down" in the case, so that the artwork on the disc itself shows through the transparent back of the case.

Most slim jewel cases sold for burned CDs use the measure by by 5 millimetres 5. They generally do not have room for a full package insert booklet, only a slip of paper for a track listing or cover art, showing only through the front of the case.

Unlike the standard jewel cases, slimline cases are made of two pieces rather than three and do not have a place for a back label. However, with this design the "spine" is narrower, making the discs more difficult to identify when stored on edge on a shelf. In the U. This packaging was much-criticized as environmentally wasteful, and was eventually dropped by most retailers in the mids, though major record companies continued to ship CDs to wholesale clubs, such as Costco and Sam's Club , in longboxes into the 21st century.

Around , the top wrap-around label sticker began to appear on most CDs, to make it easier to read what each CD was from the top without having to flip through them to see the front cover. These stickers were usually nothing more than informational labels and rarely would have any use in the marketing of the album. The wrap-around sticker also provided an extra seal, possibly as another theft deterrent.

A chiefly Japanese packaging addition is the inclusion of an obi strip , a J-card-esque paperboard slip wound around the left side of the case to show details such as the price, artist, etc. The obi strip is particularly useful in the case of Japanese releases of western artists' material, due to the fact that the cover artwork is unaltered from its original-language release. The simplest, least expensive package is a paper envelope. More expensive versions add a transparent window to the envelope allowing the disc label to be seen.

The envelope can also be made out of spunbonded polyethylene trade-named Tyvek. This is both more durable and less abrasive than paper. However, such packaging is rare for commercial releases due to its relative lack of protection compared with other designs, and is primarily limited to promotional and demo discs. It is also often used in software packages, where the box is labeled promotionally, but the disc comes in a paper sleeve to cut costs.

The Q Pack does not have a snap-in tray like a regular jewel case. It is characterized by the corrugated raised area where the top hinges to the back. Since Q Pack cases are not transparent, generally cover art is applied as a decal to the cover. Decals can also be applied to the inside front, on the tray underneath the hub and the back cover. A slot for an insert booklet is found inside the front cover as on typical jewel cases. A "digipak" or "digipack" generic term is a rectangular cardboard package with one or more plastic trays capable of holding a disc attached to the inside.

There are variations where the disc s sit on a hub or spindle inside and come in various sizes. A digipak-style case is a common alternative to the somewhat brittle jewel case. Although they are less vulnerable to cracking than a jewel case, the disc tray inside the package is still made of the same brittle plastic so is prone to cracking and the teeth of the tray hub breaking if the package is crushed.

Though actual digipak packaging has only ever been made for CDs, the term's popular usage has led to it becoming a generic term. Nowadays, it is commonly applied to similar non-brand packaging, used on all types of optical disc media. The term "digipak" was once a trademarked name but is no longer active as of March according to the United States Patent and Trademark Office. A digifile consists of a rectangular cardboard package that is similar to a digisleeve except that the disc or discs slide vertically into a horizontal slot inside the packaging.

A wallet consists of a rectangular cardboard package that is similar to a digisleeve except that the disc or discs slide horizontally into a vertical slot inside the packaging. The disc can either slide into the package or sit on a spindle, hub or tray inside. The disc usually slides into an inner sleeve whose opening need not match the outer sleeve in the manner of actual LPs.

Mini LP sleeves can either appear as single sleeves or gatefolds , identically to full-sized LP jackets, with both variants being used for a number of music releases. While used in a somewhat limited capacity in the west, where the jewel case remains the most popular form of CD packaging, mini LP sleeves are common for reissues of older albums in Japan, with their typically high level of faithfulness to the original vinyl record packaging making them sought-after among collectors.

The downside to this format is that the disc can be easily scratched each time it is taken out for play; a more serious issue can also be that if the glue that keeps the sleeve that holds the CD closed on the side closest to the spine on gatefold covers weakens, it can get onto the CD, rendering it unplayable. For these reasons, mini LP releases— particularly Japanese ones— enclose the CD in a protective sleeve made from matted plastic or rice paper.

Another disadvantage with mini LP sleeves is that, like digipaks, they are significantly more vulnerable to wear and other forms of damage compared to standard jewel cases and are more difficult to replace. In addition, the packaging is more environmentally friendly due to the use of more easily recyclable and biodegradable cardboard as opposed to the polystyrene used in jewel cases and is significantly cheaper to produce than both jewel cases and digipaks, which has made them a more favorable option in markets where CD sales are declining.

A minipack is a square cardboard package in which the disc sits on a spindle, hub or tray. This type of packaging is usually hand-made and is not seen very often. JakeBox is a paperboard packaging concept designed in Sweden, featuring a pop-up "claw". The claw releases the CD when the cover is opened and locks it again when the cover is closed. This design makes the disc easily accessible and protects the CD once the case is closed.

The DBS is comparable with plastic jewel or amaray cases when it comes to size but holds more of the features of the LP style cases in terms of light weight and printability. The DBS case opens up from the side by moving the slider part on which the disc is resting from the sleeve.

Many covermount CDs released in British magazine Mixmag used to be packaged in a discbox slider, [ citation needed ] after replacing a standard jewel box, although the discbox slider itself was replaced by a simple cardboard sleeve. The Compac Plus is a disc packaging which is similar in style to a digipak.

However, it consists of two plastic CD trays which "clip" together like a normal slipcase. The packaging was introduced in the early s. It was originally a brand which had their own logo, and was used by bands such as Blur , but as years progressed, many other artists started to use their own version of the packaging. The packaging is also known as Compact Plus. A keep case is the most common type of DVD packaging and was created by Amaray.

It is taller and thicker than a Jewel case, and is made of much softer, less brittle plastic polypropylene rather than polystyrene , so it does not break as easily. They usually hold one or two discs, but are capable of holding up to six discs. Slimmer keep cases, so called "Slim-paks" or "Thinpaks" typically used for DVD box sets consisting of the thin keep cases stored in a paperboard box.

The thin cases are half as thick and can generally only hold one disc as a result, but there are newer slim cases that have central disc holding teeth on both sides. The teeth are made in such a way that when the case is closed, they go between the gaps in between the teeth on the other side. A standard DVD case is a single-piece plastic case with two creases, which folds around and snaps closed.

It is wrapped on the outside by a thin piece of transparent plastic which can hold a paper label. Green cases of this variety were introduced to be used for titles released for the Xbox One gaming system, though with the space intended for placing the disc being on the left side of the inner case, while most other keep cases have it on the right. Each is made of a single-piece plastic tray and closure, which snaps over the right edge of the front flap.

The printed flap is made of thin paperboard which wraps around the left edge and across the back of the tray, to which it is glued. Time Warner 's two studios and their boutique labels Warner Bros. Pictures and New Line Cinema were the only entities to utilize this case design. Soft cases , also known as earth cases or green cases , are soft-shell cases made from recycled optical discs.

They are considerably more pliable than other style cases given that they are made from various mixes of plastics.

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How to Replace CD Jewel Cases (Music CD, Game Cases, etc.)

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